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Agent, state

Agent, state
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1889-1893 : Humphrey)
Date: 1890-1891
A letter from Samuel J. Crawford, Agent of the State, informs Kansas Governor Humphrey that he has introduced a bill to the House of Representatives and requests the Governor look over the bill and make any necessary changes. A bill, H. R. 6429, introduced from Mr. Funston in the House of Representatives on February 6, 1890, which requests to reimburse the State of Kansas for money expended in the adjustment and settlement of citizens of the said State for property captured or destroyed by the Confederate forces during the late war, and for other reasons. A separate letter from Samuel J. Crawford informs the Governor he has secured an adjustment of the Kansas sales of public land. A telegram from Crawford informs the Governor the bill passed and is now before the President.


Agriculture, State Board of

Agriculture, State Board of
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1889-1893 : Humphrey)
Date: 1892
A letter from the Secretary of the State Board of Agriculture informs the Governor that he has received his letter and has forward the letter to Dr. L. A. Buck at Peabody, Kansas. In the letter, the Secretary notifies the Governor he has requested Buck to create a report of the work done at the silk station in 1891. In 1885, there were discussions at the state level about establishing a silk station at Peabody, Kansas, funded by the State Legislature. In 1895, the silk station closed.


Alphabetical correspondence, A-B

Alphabetical correspondence, A-B
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1879-1883: Glick)
Date: 1883-1885
These letters are from Kansas citizens as well as out-of-state reporters and organizations to Kansas Governor G. W. Glick. The correspondents discussed various topics including coal, congress (i.e.- bills and elected officials), land and road issues, farming, events in Kansas, making appointments to meet, publications (i.e.- Emporia Gazette and The Herald) and giving thanks/congratulations. Due to the large amount of correspondence Kansas Governor G. W. Glick received from the public, the letters are divided and listed in alphabetical order.


Alphabetical correspondence, R - W

Alphabetical correspondence, R - W
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1877-1879: Anthony)
Date: 1877-1878
The following documents relate to various matters in the State of Kansas. This description does not cover all the documents in this file. A letter on September 10, 1877, from P. H. Raiford regarding the project to transport unbroken bulk of grain and other products of the Mississippi Valley to the harbors of the Southern Atlantic Ocean. A letter on December 12, 1877, from G. W. Smith, advises Governor Anthony that Mr. Haskell in the House of Representatives and Mr. Ingalls in the Senate have each introduced a bill authorizing the President to re-instate him as Captain, his former rank in the army.


An act concerning crimes and punishments and procedures relating thereto

An act concerning crimes and punishments and procedures relating thereto
Creator: Kansas Legislature.
Date: April 22, 1994
The Kansas Legislature passed House Bill 2578 on April 8, 1994. The bill reinstated the death penalty for the crime of capital murder, as defined in the bill. In 1972, the U. S. Supreme Court decision in Furman v. Georgia overturned capital punishment laws in many states, including Kansas. The murder of 19 year old college student Stephanie Schmidt in 1993 prompted reinstatement of the law, ending 22 years of debate. Though opposed to capital punishment, Governor Joan Finney allowed the bill to become law without her signature, April 22, 1994. The absence of the governor's signature is apparent on the official enrolled version of the bill represented here.


An act concerning crimes and punishments and procedures relating thereto

An act concerning crimes and punishments and procedures relating thereto
Creator: Kansas Legislature.
Date: February 20, 1990
The Kansas Legislature passed Senate Bill 77 in 1990. Known as the "hard-40" bill, the bill allowed for a maximum forty-year prison sentence for persons convicted of premeditated murder. In 1972, the U. S. Supreme Court decision in Furman v. Georgia overturned capital punishment laws in many states, including Kansas. A strong supporter of capital punishment, Governor Mike Hayden signed the forty-year bill after efforts to pass a death penalty bill failed in the legislature. Kansas did not reinstate capital punishment until 1994.


An act concerning crimes and punishments and procedures relating thereto

An act concerning crimes and punishments and procedures relating thereto
Creator: Kansas Legislature.
Date: January 31, 1985-April 09, 1985
The Kansas Legislature passed H.B. 2135 on April 2, 1985. The bill proposed to reinstate capital punishment in Kansas. In 1972, the U. S. Supreme Court decision in Furman v. Georgia overturned capital punishment laws in many states, including Kansas. Governor John Carlin vetoed the bill, his fourth and final veto of a death penalty bill during his eight year administration. The legislature failed to override the veto. Kansas reinstituted capital punishment in 1994. The cover sheet recording legislative and gubernatorial action on the legislation is included with the vetoed bill.


An act relating to crimes and penalties

An act relating to crimes and penalties
Creator: Kansas. Legislature
Date: 1935
With the capital punishment law repealed in 1907, the Kansas Legislature made several unsuccessful attempts at reinstatement in 1927, 1931, and 1933. In 1935, the legislature succeeded in reinstating the death penalty with House Bill 10. This bill file includes several different versions of the bill. The final version of the bill prescribes the punishment of death or life imprisonment for persons convicted of first degree murder. The bill allows the jury trying the case to decide the form of punishment. Although Kansas abolished the death penalty in 1907, no executions by state authority had occurred since 1870. See also, "Punishment for Murder in the First and Second Degree," Laws of Kansas, 1935, Chapter 154.


An act relating to crimes punishable by death

An act relating to crimes punishable by death
Creator: Kansas. Legislature
Date: 1935
With the capital punishment law repealed in 1907, the Kansas Legislature made several unsuccessful attempts at reinstatement in 1927, 1931, and 1933. In 1935, the legislature succeeded in reinstating the death penalty with House Bill 10. A companion bill, House Bill 11 (1935), prescribed hanging as the method for inflicting the death penalty in all cases. The bill also provided for the executioner, the time and place of execution, and cases of insanity, pregnancy, and escape. Although Kansas abolished the death penalty in 1907, no executions by state authority had occurred since 1870.


An act relating to kidnaping in the first degree

An act relating to kidnaping in the first degree
Creator: Kansas Legislature.
Date: 1955
In 1955, the Kansas Legislature expanded the state's capital punishment law with Senate Bill 80 to include the crime of kidnapping. Since the death penalty was reinstated in Kansas in 1935, after its repeal in 1907, only persons convicted of first degree murder were eligible for execution. Senate Bill 80 limits the application of the death penalty to kidnappers who have harmed their captives, though in case of a jury trial the jury is to assign the punishment. While no state-authorized executions occurred in Kansas between 1870-1944, the state executed fifteen persons between 1944-1965.


An act to amend section 8, article 2, of chapter 31 of the general statues of 1901

An act to amend section 8, article 2, of chapter 31 of the general statues of 1901
Creator: Kansas Legislature.
Date: 1907
The Kansas Legislature passed House Bill 66 by January 18 and Governor Edward W. Hoch signed the bill into law on January 30, 1907. The law abolished capital punishment in Kansas by prescribing life imprisonment, instead of the death penalty, as punishment for persons convicted of first degree murder. While executions by state authority were legal in Kansas from 1861-1907, the legislature imposed tighter regulations in 1872 that required the time of execution to be ordered by the governor. Kansas governors between 1872-1907 refused to issue execution orders, as required by law, effectively banning state authorized executions during that period. Governor Hoch was a strong opponent of capital punishment.


An act to regulate the infliction of the death penalty and to amend an act to establish a code of criminal procedure

An act to regulate the infliction of the death penalty and to amend an act to establish a code of criminal procedure
Creator: Kansas Legislature.
Date: 1872
Following the controversial, public execution of William Dickson in Leavenworth (1870), the state legislature passed Senate Bill 18 (1872) to regulate procedures for carrying out a death sentence. The act provides that the punishment of death must be by "hanging by the neck." The act also provides that the time of the execution must be ordered by the governor. In effect, this law imposed a ban on state executions since no governor ever ordered an execution between 1872-1907, the year the law was repealed. Dickson's execution would be the last conducted under state law for 73 years.


An act to repeal all poll tax laws in the state of Kansas

An act to repeal all poll tax laws in the state of Kansas
Creator: House of Representatives
Date: January 1913
This act was created by the Kansas House of Representatives in an attempt to do away with any poll taxing which required Kansas voters to pay a small fee before being able to cast their ballot. Poll taxing affected people of all races in Kansas. This act was not passed. Poll taxing continued in Kansas until the early 1960s when a federal amendment was passed which made poll taxing unconstitutional in all states.


Attorney General's Office

Attorney General's Office
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1865-1868 : Crawford)
Date: 1867
These letters, spanning 1867, are from George H. Hoyt, Attorney General, and other individuals regarding the Attorney General office's general affairs to Kansas Governor Samuel Crawford. They wrote about passed resolutions, applications for patents, and the illegality of an election. Specifically, Reuben Middleton and J. F. Broadhead's applications were discussed.


C

C
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1879-1883 : St. John)
Date: 1879-1883
This file contains several letters related to a variety of topics such as recommendation letters, inquiries regarding appointments, requests for protection, donations, as well as other matters. Included in this file is a letter from A. N. Carpenter of Galesburg, Illinois informing Kansas Governor St. John that he has sent a small donation to the State, he requests the Governor to accept the Art and hopes that it proves satisfactory and beneficial. Accompanying these letters is a copy of the Preamble and Resolution adopted by the Legislature to the jurisdiction of the courts of the United States over municipal corporations existing under the laws of the several states.


Cities & Towns : Wakefield

Cities & Towns : Wakefield
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1879-1883 : St. John)
Date: 1879
A letter from Maurice Dunsford of Wakefield, Kansas writes to ask Kansas Governor St. John to veto the bill to vacate the Market Square in Wakefield, he informs the governor if the act goes through it will depreciate the value of their lands. The following document is a petition from the residents of Wakefield to Governor St. John to veto the act to vacate certain lots and the Market Square.


Commissioner to revise laws

Commissioner to revise laws
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1877-1879: Anthony)
Date: 1877 - 1878
A letter on March 20, 1877, from W. A. Pieffer of Coffeyville, Kansas, requests an appointment as a Commissioner to revise laws.


Concurrent resolution amending the constitution of the state of Kansas

Concurrent resolution amending the constitution of the state of Kansas
Creator: Kansas. Legislature
Date: February 18, 1867
This resolution by the Kansas state legislature calls for an election on an amendment to the state constitution supporting black male suffrage. If approved by the white male voters, the word "white" would be removed from the state constitution, particularly section one of article five, thereby allowing black males to vote. This amendment to the Kansas constitution was defeated. The issue became moot in 1870 with the ratification of the 15th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution which made it illegal to deny a citizen the right to vote because of "race, color, or previous condition of servitude."


Correspondence with Other States

Correspondence with Other States
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1865-1868 : Crawford)
Date: 1867-1868
These letters, spanning 1867 to 1868, are from out of state officials regarding general correspondence to Kansas Governor Samuel Crawford. They wrote about legislation, mainly on resolutions and ratifying amendments. The correspondence came from Kentucky, Colorado, Arkansas, Michigan, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Carolina, Ohio, and Texas.


Counties : Stafford

Counties : Stafford
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1879-1883 : St. John)
Date: 1879
A letter from J. C. Towsley thanking Kansas Governor for the appointment as County Commissioner of Stafford. The following letters are memorandums that pertain to the establishment of Stafford County and address several acts that include discussions of boundary lines.


E - K

E - K
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1873-1877 : Osborn)
Date: 1873 - 1876
The documents in this folder cover various topics relating to Kansas. This description does not cover all the topics in this file. A letter from L. F. Eggers informs Kansas Governor Osborn that he received a letter asking him to go back to Pennsylvania to assist with a political campaign and asks for help with securing a pass from the railroad company. A letter on February 9, 1875, from Jacob Froth, states he is collecting material for a book on Organic Law and asks the Governor to send him a copy of the first and last constitution adopted by Kansas, his autograph, and a photograph. A letter from Daniel Grass, September 1, 1875, requests the Governor withdrawal Reverend S. Holman for the position as Chaplain of the Penitentiary. A letter from L. L. Hartman of Chanute, Kansas, asks the Governor for a letter of recommendation for the office of Register of Land.


February 1887

February 1887
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1885-1889 : Martin)
Date: February 1887
These letters, spanning February 1887, are from individuals, companies, and state offices regarding Kansas affairs to Kansas Governor John Martin. The letters cover various topics including newspaper/publication articles, railroads, criminal cases, legislation/senate bills, soldiers, the appointment of officials, and personal opinions/complaints. Governor Martin was fortunate to have acquired upon his inauguration, in 1885, a state of affairs that was persistent in prosperous economic growth, and city and town expansion.


Federal government

Federal government
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1863-1865 : Carney)
Date: 1863 - 1864
These letters, spanning 1863 to 1864, are from federal government agencies to Kansas Governor Thomas Carney regarding their general affairs. The agencies that wrote included the Treasury Department, General Land office, War Department, Department of the Interior, and State Department. They wrote about the Kansas state budget, legislation, census, a historic register of war volunteers, and Native American affairs.


Feeble Minded, School-Winfield

Feeble Minded, School-Winfield
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1879-1883 : St. John)
Date: 1881
A letter from J. B. Abbott thanks Kansas Governor St. John and the members of the Kansas State House for passing his bill for a school for those who are underdeveloped. In the letter, Abbott recommends the Governor appoint C. J. Wilber of Illinois as Superintendent of the school as he has past experience.


Forestry Commissioner

Forestry Commissioner
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1885-1889 : Martin)
Date: 1885-1889
These letters, spanning 1887, are from the Senate, Martin Allen, Morris Collar, and other individuals regarding the Forestry Commissioner position to Kansas Governor John Martin. The Senate passed a bill that created a new position, the Forestry Commissioner. Most of the letters are from individuals recommending Martin Allen, Morris Collar, F. W. Colby, Fred Collins, or S. C. Robb for the position with signed petitions. Allen and Collar wrote applying for the position. Martin appointed S. C. Robb as the Forestry Commissioner.


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